Child Support

Tennessee law currently establishes a child support obligation based upon the income shares formula. The income shares formula uses a child support worksheet which can be found and downloaded by clicking here. The child support worksheet computes the child support obligation by using the gross monthly incomes of both parents. The worksheet also requires that the total number of days that each parent spends with the child, the obligor parent’s child support obligation may be increased for lack of parenting time being exercised. In contrast, if an obligor parent spends ninety-two days or more during a calendar year with a child, the obligor parent’s child support obligation may be reduced. In addition, items such as daycare expenses, medical insurance premiums, and extraordinary medical expenses which are paid by either or both parents on behalf of a child are listed as a credit on the child support worksheet. In addition, the child support worksheet also gives a credit for other biological children that reside in your home. The worksheet also provides a credit for other children that do not reside in your home but you pay support for.

An existing child support order can be modified upon a showing of a significant variance. For all child support orders that were established after January 18, 2005, or after under the income shares guidelines, a significant variance is defined as at least a fifteen percent change between the amount of the current support order and the amount of the proposed presumptive support order. To determine if a modification is possible, you should compare the presumptive child support order amounts in the current and proposed orders. If a significant variance exists between the two amounts, such a variance will result in a modification of the child support order.